Forget About It — Alzheimer’s to Increase 285%!

By the year 2050, the incidence of Alzheimer’ disease will have increased by 285% in the USA (J. Alzheimer’s Dementia 2007;3:s168.)

Truly “Alzheimer’s is the health care crisis of the 21st century.” (J. Neurology Reviews, volume 15, page 1.) Yet, very little research money is going to this problem, while we spend as a society billions of dollars to get huge erections and perky boobs: sadly, we won’t remember what to do with them.
Here are some tips on what you could do to lower your risk of winding up in a nursing home trying to remember why you are there:

  • Avoid second hand smoking: if you have been exposed for 30 years, your risk of dementia goes up 30 %. Imagine what smoking directly does.
  • Avoid al the factors that lead to heart disease, particularly insulin resistance, or pre-diabetes: lose weight. Eat the Mediterranean diet and avoid refined sugars and transfats.
  • Consider going vegetarian.
  • Supplement omega oils, especially DHA.
  • Supplement B-complex vitamins, especially folic acid and SAMe.
  • Optimize bowel function.
  • Supplement COQ10 and antioxidants.
  • Supplement sex hormones if necessary, including DHEA.
  • Avoid unnecessary general anesthesia
  • Avoid aluminum in antiperspirants and pop cans.
  • Consider red wine.
  • If you like herbs: sage, huperzine and curcumin/turmeric.
  • Learn to play a musical instrument, avoid being lonely and exercise more.
  • Consider coffee: it helps women remember more. Do they really need any help remembering what their men have done wrong?

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Information on this blog is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use the information on this blog for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Please consult your health care practitioner with any questions or concerns you may have.