Integrative Pediatrics: three basic points on brain development

Parents understandably worry about their children’s brain development. They will do anything to maximize their child’s IQ for many reasons. Stimulating software, music, expensive schools, tutors, and many other expensive modalities are tried. Soon, gene manipulation will be available, if it is not already. As effective as they may be, they pale in effectiveness to the three points addressed below. Unfortunately, they are often not discussed enough:

  1. Brain Nutrition. Refined diets have a negative effect on the brain, particularly when it is developing. Omega oils are critical in optimizing brain function.
  2. Chemicals, Drugs, and Pollution have a negative effect on brain development. Common drugs like Tylenol and NSAIDs have significant negative effects on children. Antidepressants may harm brain development.
  3. Emotional IQ. It does Johnny no good to have a high I.Q. when he is depressed and can’t get along. Parental loving and acceptance supersedes any software to optimize cognitive development.

 

REFERENCES

  • J. Ped August 2016Volume 175, Pages 16–21 The Role of Nutrition in Brain Development: The Golden Opportunity of the “First 1000 Days”
  • J. Ped August 2016Volume 175, Pages 1–4 Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: risks outweigh benefits.
  • Controversy over use of antidepressants in children, http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/753055_3
  • Tylenol may harm fetus in pregnancy, SOURCE: http://bit.ly/29kqXYa Int J Epidemiol 2016
  • Prenatal paracetamol exposure and child neurodevelopment: a sibling-controlled cohort study, Int. J. Epidemiol. (2013) 42 (6): 1702-1713. doi: 10.1093/ije/dyt183 First published online: October 24, 2013
  • Curr Drug Metab. 2012 May 1;13(4):474-90. Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pregnancy: impact on the fetus and newborn.
  • Increased Acetaminophen use Major Cause Autism, Attention Deficit with Hyperactivity, and Asthma, Journal of Restorative Medicine, Volume 2, Number 1, October 2013, pp. 14-29(16)
  • Increased Acetaminophen use Major Cause Autism, Attention Deficit with Hyperactivity, and Asthma, Journal of Restorative Medicine, Volume 2, Number 1, October 2013, pp. 14-29(16)

 

Prenatal exposure to pollution linked to behavioral issues later in life, study suggests

TIME (3/17, Park) reports a new study published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry suggests that prenatal exposure to pollution may be linked to behavioral problems and emotional stress later in life. Researchers monitored 462 children and found that “those whose mothers showed higher levels of PAH at delivery (an indicator of PAH levels during pregnancy), were less likely to regulate their behaviors and emotions at age 9 and 11 than those whose mothers showed lower levels of the pollutant.”

Hugo Rodier, MD is an integrative physician based in Draper, Utah who specializes in healing chronic disease at the cellular level by blending proper nutrition, lifestyle changes, & allopathic practices when necessary.

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